Deaf People Able To Communicate With Kinect

sign-language-software

Deaf and poor hearing people are now able to communicate through their computers using a Kinect-camera, including with people that do not understand sign language.

In a video researchers of Microsoft and the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) show how the software is able to recognize separate words and sentences in sign language.

When multiple words are used behind each other the software is able to remember all previous sentences so that it is able to produce a logical sentence.

Cause of the findings of the research team deaf and poor hearing people are not only able to communicate with other deaf and poor hearing people through their computer, but also with others that do not understand sign language. The software is able to translate signs into text. The person at the other side of the line can type text on its computer which an avatar translates in sign language for the deaf or poor hearing person.

According to professor Xilin Chen from the Chinese Academy of Science “the most significant contribution is that the project demonstrates the possibility of sign-language recognition with readily available, low-cost 3-D and 2-D sensors.”

In the blog post in which Microsoft explains its sign language Kinect project it doesn’t make clear what the error margin of the system is.

For their research Microsoft and CAS worked together with a wide range of deaf and poor hearing people to test the software. When the program will be broadly available for consumers is still unclear. Microsoft mentioned the software should be available somewhere in the “near future”.

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Rowan Gonzalez

Founder & Chief Web Editor at Computer Stories
Rowan is the founder and Chief Web Editor of Computer Stories. He studied Communication and Multimedia Design at the University of Applied Sciences in Amsterdam from which he graduated in 2013. Rowan's passionate about computer technologies that make the world and our lives a little better.